Posted on 09 Sep 2017 by Kyle Johnson

PAX West: Shots Fired

The Defence

Developer: Chryse
Publisher: Another Indie
Genre: Action, Indie
Platform: Consoles, Mac, PC
Review copy: No
Release date: No data.

The Prosecution

Minimum
Recommended
OS: Windows
CPU: Intel Pentium 4 1.4 GHz
AMD equivalent
VGA: Nvidia GeForce 450
AMD equivalent
RAM: 1 GB
HDD: 1 GB
DirectX:
Controller: None
Mod Support: Unknown
VR: No
FOV Slider: No
FPS Lock: Unknown
OS: Windows
CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo 2.3 GHz
AMD equivalent
VGA: Nvidia GeForce 660
AMD equivalent
RAM: 1 GB
HDD: 1 GB
DirectX:
Controller: None
Mod Support: Unknown
VR: No
FOV Slider: No
FPS Lock: Unknown

What do you get when you combine American pop culture with mass-market media and a slightly irreverent tale of revenge? Shots Fired, that’s what. Where the main, unnamed character speaks entirely in emojis, said character is a photojournalist working for “FuzzBeed,” a social media site, but also a sniper who uses the “huntr” app to track down his next targets. Though Shots Fired is still in a very early alpha state, I still got a chance to check it out at Another Indie’s booth at PAX West.

Shots Fired opens with your wife getting murdered and your daughter captured, along with your house being ransacked. With your 19 inch tube television missing, your first step is getting some apartment fixings back. As it was an early alpha build, many of the steps and much of the backstory is left for a later release, but your first order of business is to buy a rifle.

FuzzBeed, thankfully, is willing to pay 15 dollars for a picture of literal garbage. Both the photography challenges and the sniping challenges involve solving basic riddles to pinpoint the exact target you should be shooting. For the photography, you are more often than not taking pictures of landmarks and city features, in an attempt to make for unique clickbait. The photo shooting does factor into the story, as well. Before you can take revenge on the thieves who killed your wife and raided your house, you have to lure them out first. This might be done by taking pictures of a target’s roommate or ex-girlfriend, all in an attempt to track your prey.

One shot, one kill...or not.

For the sniping portions, things are a tad more challenging. You’re given brief, sometimes vague descriptions of who you should be after, plus photographs of some identifying features. Even when you enter the same area as the target, there’s no guarantee that you’ll end up nabbing the right one. Though there was no penalty in the demo for shooting an incorrect bystander, there will be consequences for picking the wrong target in the full release.

It’s all very strange, in a voyeuristic sort of way. By only interacting with the world through either a lens or a scope, you’re treated to some good-looking wide shots of “The Flat Earth,” Shots Fired’s setting. Simply watching the citizens go on about their lives is interesting enough, before you even add your own violence into the mix. With its emphasis on using the phone to dodge the incoming police in a simple maze-solving minigame, finding contacts to kill, shopping for weapons and more skills, Shots Fired seems to place screen-tuned culture in its crosshairs as much as the targets themselves.

Shots Fired is set to release either later this year, or early next year.

Gallery


Related news
No related news.
Related articles
No related articles.

Comments (0)